Archives for posts with tag: Women

open book on a cloudThe All Good Books group will meet a week later than usual in August (on the 17th rather than the 10th) at 7 PM in the Community of Christ Church Library (7842 Mission Road, Prairie Village, KS) to discuss The Magic Hour by Anita Shreve.

There are some fascinating discussion questions available online at https://kristinhannah.com/books/magic-hour/book-clubs/. After you read the book, take a look at the 14 questions posted online.

We hope you can join us on the 17th!

The All Good Books group will meet tonight at 7:00 PM in the Community of Christ Church Library (7842 Mission Road, Prairie Village, KS) to discuss The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware.

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There are suggested discussion questions in an earlier post (see https://goo.gl/Hc7K6u).
 

We’ll have coffee ready, so come and enjoy the book club chat!

The All Good Books group will meet on Thursday, July 13, 2017 in the Community of Christ Church Library (7842 Mission Road, Prairie Village, KS) at 7:00 PM to discuss The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware. You’re invited!

Woman_in_Cabin_10Here are some possible discussion questions:

  1. How would you describe the book? A roller coaster ride? Predictable mystery? Careful attention to detail? Just a fun read? Unexpected twists and turns? Not what I expected? Kept me reading and on the edge of my seat?
  2. Did you find Lo (Laura) a likable, believable character? Why or why not?
  3. What was the connection between the burglary at Lo’s apartment and the events on the ship?
  4. Which characters aroused your suspicions during the story? Who did you think was the woman in Cabin 10? Why? Did that change?
  5. What is Stockholm Syndrome and do you think that effected Lo and Carrie’s relationship?
  6. How effective were the email messages in moving the story forward? Were they necessary? Irrelevant. Red herrings?
  7. What was the connection between the dark haired girl in a Pink Floyd t-shirt on Archer’s phone and the woman in cabin 10? Was that photo relevant to the mystery or a red herring?
  8. Was Carrie a victim, co-conspirator or primary conspirator in the crime on the high seas?
  9. Why did Lo have a change of heart at the end of the novel and decide to move to New York? Did that seem like a normal response?
  10. What happened to the main characters by the end of the book? Lo, Judah, Richard, Anne, Ben, Carrie, and Johann? Others?
  11. How was the mystery resolved and were you satisfied with the ending of the story? Why or why not?
  12. Were there unanswered questions in the plot? If so, what wasn’t covered or finalized in the ending?

Aviator's WifeThe next meeting of the All Good Books Club is at 7:00 PM, this Thursday, January 15, 2015 at the Leawood Pioneer Library (4700 Town Center Drive, Leawood, KS) to discuss  “The Aviator’s Wife” by Melanie Benjamin.

Unless you’re already familiar with more than the typically brief “history book” version of the Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh story, you will probably learn far more than you want to know in Benjamin’s well researched novel.  Much has been written on Lindbergh and most American’s think they know his history, but in most cases that “knowledge” is superficial (see http://www.history.com/news/history-lists/10-fascinating-facts-about-charles-lindbergh and http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/lindbergh/sfeature/fallen.html for a sampling of little know facts).

A few questions that might generate discussion for Thursday night’s meeting:

  1. What is the most significant fact or event in the life of Charles Lindbergh that you didn’t know prior to reading The Aviator’s Wife?
  2. What is the most significant fact or event in the life of Anne Morrow Lindbergh that you didn’t know prior to reading The Aviator’s Wife?
  3. Why do you think that Anne Morrow married Charles Lindbergh? Why do you think Charles married Anne?
  4. What’s your reaction to the Lindbergh’s parenting skills and methods?
  5. Describe the marital relationship between Anne and Charles. Why did it work? What didn’t work?
  6. What clue does the following quote offer about the role of women in the 1930s-1950s? Does the quote apply today? “I was Mom. I was Wife. I was Tragedy. I was Pilot. They all were me, and I, them. That was a fate we could not escape, we women; we would always be called upon by others in a way men simply never were. But weren’t we always, first and foremost —woman? Wasn’t there strength in that, victory, clarity— in all the stages of a woman’s life?” – page 340.
  7. The author suggests “JEALOUSY IS A TERRIBLE THING. It keeps you up at night, it demands tremendous energy in order to remain alive, and so you have to want to feed it, nurture it—and by so wanting, you have to acknowledge that you are a bitter, petty person. It changes you.” – page 333. Do you agree or disagree? How was Anne changed?
  8. How has your view of Lindbergh changed as a result of reading The Aviator’s Wife?

We hope you’ll join us on Thursday evening!